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Showing posts from July, 2011

The move from impressions to expressions

A lot of us remember when the role of the CMO was much simpler. Information flowed in one direction: from companies to consumers. When we drew up our plans and budgets, the key metric was consumer impressions: how many people would see, hear or read our ad?

Today the only place that approach still works is on Mad Men. Now information flows in many directions, consumer touch points have multiplied, and the old, one-size-fits-all approach has given way to precision marketing and one-to-one communications. Perhaps the most consequential change is how consumers have become empowered to create their own content about our brands and share it throughout their networks and beyond.

In the near term, "consumer impressions" will remain the backbone of our measurement because it is the metric universally used to compare audiences across nearly all types of media. But impressions only tell advertisers the raw size of the audience. By definition, impressions are passive. T…

News Of The World - Feeds Cancer to Puppy's hacking

In Marketing, in Sales, in the neurosis that is us living in the very late 21st Century there's a deep rooted fear that we share with our medieval forebears - THE DARK.
The dark is an unknown place, a place without guide or light and ultimately a place without hope.
The Oxford English describes it thus;
1[no object] plan and direct the course of a ship, aircraft, or other form of transport, especially by using instruments or maps:they navigated by the stars
...by the stars, by light, by direction.
Ok, Ok, enough of the cheap Gothic novella but it leads a lads mind to thinking. Each and every year we get to read the many lists of trends we will or wont see and one particular thought that I've been mulling over is; will we see a trend towards a "Great Switch Off", stemming from the perpetual night of a disappointed and despondent socially connected online world?


Privacy and the abuse and/or protection of has become a very national sport in the UK over the last few days an…

Banner advertising -

I know it's not as sexy to talk about advertising concepts as it is to talk about the technology that advances advertising concepts, but I was a copywriter once upon a time and that shit stays in your blood.

So what's wrong with this ad? The second I saw it, I targeted it as junior. It's not the art direction, as that's actually a pretty strong visual and I like the classic layout. Very old school. And it's not the placement. This ad appeared on weather.com. Not that I fall for the Valentine flowers bit, but it's not a Tampon ad. They know I'm there. The problem with this ad is the headline. Her Friends Will Be Jealous. It's a knee jerk line that wasn't written by someone who understands the nuances of writing advertising.

Do you think this placement cost anything? Sure it did. I have no idea how much, but it wasn't free. So ProFlowers paid for this ad to run. Thus, there's a reason it's there. Like with any banner ad, …

Predict it baby - predictive modelling

What is predictive modelling in marketing?

Predictive modelling is a term with many applications in statistics but in database marketing it is a technique used to identify customers or prospects who, given their demographic characteristics or past purchase behaviour, are highly likely to purchase a given product. In this context, ‘predictive’ does not simply mean predicting the future; it means identifying the quantitative factors that can be used to predict buyer behaviour. Predictive modelling is a powerful data analysis technique that can be used to target email and direct mail activity, and to some degree behavioural targeting in online media.

Here’s an example: Let say you sell 10 products. It may be the case that all purchasers of product 8 are: 1) in a certain geodemographic group, 2) married with more than one child and 3) own more than one car. All these factors can be analysed and combined to predict the likelihood of any consumer in your database buying product 8. Usually th…